Tuesday UX Trainer: How to design your UX career

tuesday-ux-trainer-issue-7

You’re reading an issue of Tuesday UX Trainer, a series that teaches you something new about UX design every week.

Pre-PS: You can design your UX career however you want…but you still have to interview. This week only, Master the UX Interview is 25% off using this link.

  1. Designing your UX career (51 min video)

Approximately 99.99% of you on this newsletter are interested in designing your UX career. More interesting projects, making more money, with more kewl ppl.

Ben Sykes is a UX luminary who’s started his own agency, served in the military, and advised big corporations on UX. Most notably (to me), he had a hand in designing much of the curriculum for UXDI students at General Assembly.

In this lecture he brings design thinking into the personal realm of career planning. I especially dig the exercises starting at 10:20, in which you imagine what’d you do concretely every day in your dream job.

Then, you explore what your nightmare job would be :P Great exercises that really gets you thinking.

Watch the presentation here: https://vimeo.com/110045639

  1. An incomplete visual guide on how to use icons (article)

Icons. As a UX and interface designer you can’t avoid ’em. But there’s a right and wrong time to use icons.

This cheeky article covers different use cases of icons, from the practical (signage) to the not so practical (poop emoji’s on children).

Read the article: https://blog.prototypr.io/a-wholly-incomplete-visual-guide-on-how-to-use-icons-on-things-ad2a4f1f614b

  1. Good UX but your content sucks? (Reddit discussion)

You can have beautiful designs and interactions. The IA and userflows can be on point.

But does it matter if the content sucks?

This is an interesting Reddit discussion in which the OP asks about the dilemma of bad content sitting within an otherwise good design framework.

One helpful redditor said… “do a mapping exercise where you start with your customers goals, and work backwards, starting with tasks, supporting content, and the benefit to the organization.”

Here’s the full discussion: https://www.reddit.com/r/userexperience/comments/6r33jw/good_ux_but_our_content_sucks/

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Keep learnin’,

Oz / UX Coach @ UXBeginner.com

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